6 Tips for Healthy Hair

I was not blessed with the luscious locks gene, nor such healthy hair and scalp. Typical for us Nordic people, my hair is fine, thin, flat, brittle and overall pain in the butt to style. So I try my best to give my hair nutrition it needs to regain some volume and shine. When we moved to California 3 years ago it slowly started becoming even finer and harder to manage, so I had to start doing some research on how to restore my hair.

And I can now say that my strands are much thicker than before!

I wish I had saved a strand of my hair before starting this protocol so I could show you the difference in thickness. I haven’t used regular (natural) shampoo for over a year (and no toxic supermarket shampoos for 8+ years), no hair sprays or other styling products.

I’m currently using New Wash, and Henna shampoo bar, and wash my hair once or twice per week (depending how many hot yoga classes I take).  I add essential rosemary oil in the New Wash to further help hair/scalp.

I also rub coconut, sesame or castor oil in my scalp before wash, sometimes I spray apple cider vinegar on it, and tiny bit Argan oil to the dry ends after washing.

But feeding your hair internally is the most important way to strengthen it.

Here are my tips for healthy hair inside out:

1. Chia seeds

Healthy fats are a must for great hair. Chia seeds contain omega-3 fatty acids to promote circulation so that maximum nutrition gets to your hair follicle as well as antioxidants that help protect your hair from free radicals. Add chia seeds in your water or smoothie, or make chia pudding. Recipe here.

2. Greens

Healthy hair needs minerals and protein because your hair is mostly made up of protein. Green leafy vegetables have high-quality and easily assimilated amino acids that build the macronutrient in your body and digest well. They also supply wide variety of minerals, such as vitamins A, C, E, and K. Make sure you keep rotating your greens at least weekly by alternating between spinach, chard, kale, arugula, collard greens and so on. Have them in your smoothies, wraps, salads and as side dishes.

 

3. Bee pollen

Bee pollen contains many minerals, antioxidants, and B vitamins, and is a complete protein. If you’re able to find local bee pollen, even better. Throw some in your smoothies, granola or yogurt. Introduce it to your diet in tiny amounts, gradually increasing the dosage to make sure there’s no allergies or sensitivities to it.

4. Pumpkin seeds

Pumpkin seeds contain biotin (B7), which promotes the growth of strong, healthy hair. They’re also rich in vitamin C, which helps to produce sebum in your body (oil) that conditions hair. Throw pumpkin seeds in your granola, yogurt, salads and on top of pretty much any dish.

5. Hot water

Water helps flush out toxins and that way supports your main detoxifying organ, the liver. When you drink something cold it may contract your stomach, impairing it from properly secreting enzymes. On the other hand, hot water (try herbal teas and hot water with lemon, or cinnamon) helps enhance the cleansing process. Even for the regular drinking water, make it room temperature as often as possible, and avoid adding ice. I keep my water pitcher on the counter instead of the refrigerator. We have second one in the fridge for my husband who enjoys cold water :).

6. Supplements

I take Silica Complex with horsetail, and vegan collagen builder with biotin from Garden of Life and switch between these two. Also, at night I make a wellness mix of water with chlorella, lemon juice, probiotics,  MCT oil and chug it down first thing in the morning. Lemon juice cuts the flavor of chlorella really nicely so it doesn’t actually taste bad. Try it!

2 Comment

  1. […] sulphates, parabens or animal-testing, and it’s 100% vegan, made in Australia. Of course, hair health starts on the inside, but external boost doesn’t hurt either (as long as your products don’t have […]

  2. I never knew about the use of bee pollen for hair. What a great tip, thanks so much!

Leave a Reply